MS History/Geography

Students in middle school begin to study history from a more modern perspective. While their previous experience of history has taken them many centuries into the past, middle school students look specifically at the 19th and 20th centuries. They use their new level of abstract thinking to analyze how historical trends and events came about, and what the consequences were.

At LMS, students often take on roles of historical figures, in dramatic role-plays and in their written work. They analyze historical documents and images, on their own and with others. They learn to take notes in class and learn information for tests. They read textbooks as well as primary source documents, pulling out the main ideas and presenting them to peers. They are often asked to relate their readings to their own ideas, and to modern political and social issues. 
Students in middle school begin to study history from a more modern perspective. While their previous experience of history has taken them many centuries into the past, middle school students look specifically at the 19th and 20th centuries. They use their new level of abstract thinking to analyze how historical trends and events came about, and what the consequences were. The skills of historical analysis include the ability to explain the significance of historical evidence; weigh the importance, reliability, and validity of evidence; understand the concept of multiple causation; and understand the importance of changing and competing interpretations of different historical developments.

At LMS, students often take on roles of historical figures, in dramatic role-plays and in their written work. They analyze historical documents and images, on their own and with others. They learn to take notes in class and learn information for tests. They read textbooks as well as primary source documents, pulling out the main ideas and presenting them to peers. They are often asked to relate their readings to their own ideas, and to modern political and social issues. The rich curriculum comes from Facing History and Ourselves, PBS, and other sources.

Because middle school students will be exposed to the facts of history again in high school, middle school is a time for them to learn to think like historians, rather than to get a broad-brush overview of American history. We take time to delve into the big, essential questions about historical situations, as we study a time period in depth: Why did so many people go along with Hitler when they knew it was wrong? How did all sides of the Mexican-American war feel like they were “in the right”? How much should government intervene in the free market? These questions are engaging and developmentally appropriate for the middle school brain, which is learning to see a new level of complexity, and also has a strong sense of justice.

History work often relates to the work students are doing in Literature and Science classes. As with most subjects, middle school students do history in mixed-age groups, on a two-year rotation.
Back